Congress Blocks Sanders Amendment That Would Have Cut Defense Spending By $74 Billion

Democrats aren’t just trying to defund the police. They’re also trying to defund America’s armed forces.

But thankfully, Republicans have stopped the radical Democrat plan from passing in Congress.

Both the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives blocked a radical bill from Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders that would have cut America’s defense spending budget by $74 million, according to Defense News.

“Given all the unprecedented crisis the country faces, now is not the time to increase the Pentagon’s bloated $740 billion budget. At a time when 30 million Americans are in danger of losing their jobs, now is not the time to be spending more on national defense than we did during the Cold War, the Vietnam War, and the Korean War,” Sanders said.

Good thing most lawmakers disagreed with him.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell referred to the bill as a “socialist spending spree” and said that it would “literally decimate” America’s defense if passed.

The GOP-controlled Senate voted 23-77 against Sanders’ amendment.

The Democratic-controlled House also rejected a companion bill, 93-324.

Republicans were furious over the idea of defunding America’s troops, especially McConnell.

“The Democratic leader, who in almost every floor speech tries to accuse this administration of being too soft on America’s adversaries, wants to literally decimate our defense budget to finance a socialist spending spree,” McConnell said.

“Defense spending demonstrates our will to defend ourselves and our interests in a dangerous world. Keeping our nation safe is our foremost constitutional duty. We cannot shirk it,” he added.

“The Democratic leader, who in almost every floor speech tries to accuse this administration of being too soft on America’s adversaries, wants to literally decimate our defense budget to finance a socialist spending spree,” McConnell said. “Defense spending demonstrates our will to defend ourselves and our interests in a dangerous world. Keeping our nation safe is our foremost constitutional duty. We cannot shirk it.”

Rhode Island Democratic Sen. Jack Reed said Sanders’ amendment would jeopardize defense-related jobs and upend the carefully negotiated bipartisan budget agreement from 2018, which set spending levels for defense and domestic spending for two years.

“This across-the-board approach, it’s good for a headline, it’s good to make a point, but we’re here to make policy, and I hope we do make policy,” Reed said.

After his amendment failed in both chambers, Sanders released a statement acting as if he had made meaningful progress in aiming to reduce funding for the military.

“We are going to continue building a political movement which understands that it is far more important to invest in working people, the children, the elderly, and the poor than in spending more on defense than the next 11 nations combined,” he said.