Advertisement
Trending

Tucker Carlson Makes Announcement About His Future Plans, Fox News Departure

Advertisement

OPINION: This article may contain commentary which reflects the author's opinion.


Former Fox News host Tucker Carlson has lifted the veil on how and why he and the network parted ways.

It came during an interview with Barstool Sports owner David Portnoy on X, formerly known as Twitter, where the two asked each other questions.

He also said he was not a fan of the network’s decision to not feature Republican presidential contender and former President Donald Trump on the network even as he is likely to be the Party’s nominee.

The network, he said, was “not really covering the news anymore,” he said in the interview with Barstool Sports owner Dave Portnoy.

“The Murdochs never got in my way. They were always good to me,” he said.

“It’s a company run by fearful women, you know what I mean?” he said.

Advertisement

The Barstool Sports owner said that he believed Carlson wanted to stick it to Fox News with his interview with the former president during the Republican primary debate.

“To me, the Trump interview seemed like something—it looked like you guys were sticking it to Fox,” the CEO said.

“I would never want to stick it to Fox,” the former host said. “No, I’m not mad at Fox. I’m really not.”

“Well, it was the night of the debate, but the reason that it was, is because he didn’t want to do the debate. I didn’t make that decision for him,” he said.

He said that the former president “approached us and said, ‘You know, I’m not gonna do the debate,’ but if I’m being totally honest, I didn’t really believe him,” He said it was likely that the former president wanted the interview at the same time as the debate because he “doesn’t like Fox.”

“But they don’t like him. You know, they never did, and they always had rules about not allowing him on,” the former host said. “My view was, I think it’s totally legitimate you just don’t like Donald Trump. I don’t hold that against anybody.”

The former host said his “view on Fox hasn’t really changed,” and that management “let me say whatever I want, whatever I wanted really for 14 years and I’ll never stop being grateful for that.”

“And then obviously, I said too much, and I’m not exactly sure what I said that was bad. No one ever told me. But one day, they were like, ‘Nope! Can’t have this anymore.’ And they fired me,” he said, which is the first time he acknowledged what happened between him and the network. “And I even told them as they were firing me, like, ‘It’s your business.’ I made a mental note. Never work for anyone else again and I never will.”

In July Carlson landed a massive deal for seven figures as he continues to work on getting released from his Fox News contract.

The deal is for more then $1 million and is with a company known as Public Square, an online marketplace similar to Amazon but for people with conservative values,” Axios reported.

Advertisement

Omeed Malik, the chief executive and chairman of the board of the blank check company looking to take PublicSq public this month, is also planning to invest in Carlson’s company, sources told Axios.

Malik is also planning to invest seven or eight figures in Carlson’s media empire through his private investment firm, 1789 Capital, a source told Axios.

1789 Capital focuses investments in companies that support the “Replication/Parallel Economy,” “Deglobalization” and “Anti-ESG (i.e. sectors that have been negatively impacted by such principles).”

Carlson is said to be looking to raise hundreds of millions of dollars to start his own online digital media company, The Wall Street Journal reported.

The report is said to have drawn massive interest from both companies and private investors looking to partner with the former Fox News host.

“The deal is being brokered through Carlson’s team and PublicSq directly, a source said, although The Journal reported that Carlson’s team has been in touch with Twitter about expanding its partnership,” Axios said.

“Carlson’s new venture will center around video primarily, both through an owned and operated website and app, and through free video distributed on Twitter, and possibly other social platforms,” it said.

Back to top button